Sarajevo Tunnel

Five meters below the runway of Sarajevo’s airport runs a short stretch of tunnel that was dug out during the Siege of Sarajevo to bring supplies to the cut-off city. For four years this 800-meter long tunnel was the besieged city’s only connection to the outside world, and its life support.

Metro-2

Metro-2 in Moscow, Russia, is the informal name for a purported secret underground metro system which parallels the public Moscow Metro. The system was supposedly built, or at least started, during the time of Joseph Stalin and was codenamed D-6 by the KGB.

Agloe

In the 1930s, a small town named Agloe suddenly began appearing on the maps of New York. It was positioned near an unmarked dirt road that led from Roscoe to Rockland, and near to Beaverkill.

Željava Air Base

Situated in the west of Bosnia on the border with Croatia, Objekat 505, as it was officially known, was the largest underground airport in the Balkans. The primary purpose of the Objekat 505 was to house a long-range radar early warning system, akin to NORAD, as well as to provide a strategic command center for the country’s defense.

The Dolerite Columns

The coastline of the southern Tasmania, in Australia, is composed of stunning rock columns that protrude up to 300 meters from the sea level. These rocks are what geologists call dolerites, with its distinct elongated shape and hexagonal columns.

Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by the Western Allies to the best-known Berlin Wall crossing point between East Berlin and West Berlin during the Cold War.

Gulliver’s Travels Park

The park was built next to Mount Fuji near Aokigahara – Japan’s famous ‘suicide forest’ – and close to the former headquarters of Aum Shinrikyo, the religious cult responsible for 13 deaths in the Tokyo sarin nerve gas attack of 1995.

Belzec Extermination Camp

Belzec was the first of the Nazi German extermination camps created for the purpose of implementing the Operation Reinhard – which entailed the murder of some 2.2 million Jews, during the Holocaust.

Excelsior Tunnel

In 1959 it was the centre of project Military Atomic Energy Authority operation orpheus investigating the possibility of masking the seismic signal given out by underground nuclear tests.

Zhangye Danxia Landform

The Danxia landform refers to various landscapes found in southeast and southwest China that “consist of a red bed characterized by steep cliffs”.

Al Qal’a of Beni Hammad

Beni Hammad Fort, also called Al Qal’a of Beni Hammad is a fortified palatine city in Algeria. Now in ruins, in the 11th century, it served as the first capital of the Hammadid dynasty.

Vajont Dam

The Vajont Dam (or Vaiont Dam) is a disused dam in Italy, which was completed in 1959. On 9 October 1963, during initial filling, a massive landslide caused a man-made megatsunami in the lake in which 50 million cubic metres of water overtopped the dam in a wave 250 metres (820 ft) high, leading to 1,910 deaths and the complete destruction of several villages and towns.

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu is a 15th-century Inca site located 2,430 metres (7,970 ft) above sea level, in the Cusco Region, Urubamba Province, Machupicchu District in Peru.

Glass Beach on Ussuri Bay

Known as ‘Glass Beach’, for many years the coastline looked the opposite of a pristine and perfect beauty spot. It was a Soviet era tip, where truckloads of broken vodka bottles and cracked porcelain were dumped. Over many years, the waves smoothed away the sharp edges as it turned the shards of glass and china over in the water. They have now become a tourist attraction on Ussuri Bay, near the naval port of Vladivostok in the east.

Hashima Island

Hashima Island is one among 505 uninhabited islands in Nagasaki Prefecture about 15 kilometers (9 miles) from Nagasaki itself.